Weird science? Check. Case studies at CHEST 2016 that are a little out of the ordinary

October 17, 2016 by CHEST Guest Writer

CHEST Annual Meeting 2016 brings clinicians and researchers from around the globe to present unique case studies on pulmonary medicine, critical care medicine, and sleep medicine topics. These case studies provide valuable insight, and some are, well, a little out of the ordinary.

The case of a steak and a lone star tick

Read “The case of a steak and a lone star tick”

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Vermont admitted a 69-year-old man having an anaphylactic reaction after consuming a steak only a few hours earlier. The patient had no previous knowledge of any allergies. After further discussion, it was revealed that the patient had been bit by the lone star tick several days earlier. The tick bite can cause sensitivity to the oligosaccharide alpha-gal, which can be found in animal meat and caused the patient’s new allergy to steak.

The case of a steak and a lone star tick

Sparkling or still?

Read “Sparkling or still?”

A 25-year-old woman with a past medical history of asthma and anaphylactic reactions to multiple medications, including sulfa antibiotics, was admitted with a facial rash, pruritus, swelling of the tongue, difficulty swallowing, and shortness of breath shortly after drinking sparkling water. During her treatment, doctors noted her symptoms were not improving. When they noticed she was still drinking the same sparkling water initially causing the anaphylactic reaction, they  advised the patient to discontinue consuming the sparkling water. She made a full recovery.

Sparkling or still?

A case to make your skin crawl

Read “A case to make your skin crawl
In a case submitted by the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, a 47-year-old man with a significant health history was admitted with abdominal pain, hemoptysis, fever, and a petechial rash. During admission he’d become hypoxemic and hypotensive. During testing and intubation, blood samples confirmed not only a case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage but also revealed the presence of numerous strongyloides larvae. During his stay and treatment, the rash spread where biopsies confirmed the presence of multiple scattered larvae and parasites in his skin. Although this case demonstrates the successful treatment of a multiorgan strongyloides hyperinfection, with the presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and a petechial rash it’s title doesn’t lie.

A case to make your skin crawl

What weird science have you seen at CHEST?
 


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