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Sister Society Sessions at CHEST 2017

September 28, 2017

The CHEST Annual Meeting in Toronto will offer cutting-edge education for current pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine topics. Along with innovative and interactive simulation, postgraduate courses, and keynotes and lectures, we will have featured sessions presented by our sister societies. These sessions will provide valuable insight for improving your career as an educator, a clinician, or a researcher. See the available sessions. 

Association of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Program Directors (APCCMPD)

Teaching the Teachers 2017: A Symposium for Clinician Educators

Sunday, October 29

1:30 – 4:15 pm

This plenary session will review best practices in education, including newer methods of knowledge transfer, assessment, provision of feedback, and dissemination and publication of educational efforts. Educational leadership in our specialty is aware of the paucity of courses dedicated to teaching excellence. This session is intended for a broader spectrum of medical educators, including those who teach both graduate and undergraduate medical trainees.

Objectives:

  • Explain why the “flipped classroom” may provide better engagement and retention among learners.
  • Summarize best practices in bedside teaching, including the "one- minute preceptor."
  • Educate trainees in the art of clinical reasoning.

Faculty:

  • Jack Buckley, MD, MPH, FCCP – Optimizing Bedside Teaching
  • Alexander Niven, MD, FCCP – Measuring Important Outcomes: Designing an Effective Observation
  • Patricia Kritek, MD, FCCP – You Call That Competent?: Standardizing Faculty Observation
  • Mark Lavercombe, MBBS, FCCP – Peer Observation as a Method of Improving Teaching Skills
  • William Kelly, MD, FCCP – Identifying and Addressing Learner Challenges: A Case-Based Discussion

Journal Session

Systematic Reviews Can Help You Take Care of Patients and Launch Your Academic Career

Sunday, October 29

1:30 – 3:30 pm

A high quality systematic review, as a source of “best evidence,” is a scientific investigation that focuses on a specific question and uses explicit, prespecified scientific methods to identify, select, assess, and summarize the findings of similar but separate studies. As such, it has the potential to answer specific clinical questions and/or serve as the basis from which trustworthy guidelines can be developed. In addition to providing important clinical information that can help you manage patients, mastering the performance of carrying out systematic reviews can lead to an academic career as a clinical researcher filling in gaps in knowledge uncovered by the systematic review or as a methodologist, helping others perform high quality systematic reviews.

Objectives:

  • Learning what comprises a systemic review.
  • Learning how to perform a systematic review and how to synthesize the evidence.
  • Learning how to assess the quality of a systematic review.

Faculty:

  • Richard Irwin, MD, Master FCCP – Systematic Reviews and Their Place in Clinical Care and Research
  • Cynthia French, PhD, RN, FCCP – Elements of a Systematic Review: The IOM Standards – A Perspective From 30,000 Feet
  • Sheena Patel, MPH – Elements of a Systematic Review and How to Synthesize the Evidence
  • Belinda Ireland, MD – What Does the Reviewer Need to Know About the Quality of the Systematic Review?

Society of Thoracic Surgeons

Advances in the Treatment of End-Stage Lung Disease

Monday, October 30

11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Evolving concepts in the care of end-stage lung disease will be discussed, including referral to a lung transplant center, evolving aspects of the lung transplant listing process, the evolution and current state of medical and surgical lung volume reduction, and advances in donor lung preservation, transplantation, and perioperative care.

Objectives:

  • Understand when to refer to a lung transplant center and the complexities of the listing process.
  • Explain the options for surgical management of COPD, including lung volume reduction.
  • Describe the complexities of lung transplantation, including organ preservation, and perioperative management.

Faculty:

  • Lianne Singer, MD, FCCP – When to Refer a Patient to a Transplant Pulmonologist: Evolving Indications for Listing and Transplanting
  • Thomas Waddell, MD – Surgical Management of COPD, Including LVRS
  • Marcelo Cypel, MD – Advances in Lung Transplantation

Italian Delegates

How Dyspnea Can Be Influenced by Current Available Therapeutics Options

Sunday, October 29

4:40 – 5:40 pm

Chronic respiratory diseases are characterized by the onset of symptoms that reflect the gravity of functional impairment due to the primary disease. These are also called patient-centered outcomes (PCO), as they are measured to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic options (either pharmacologic either nonpharmacologic). In the case of COPD, PCO are represented by dyspnea, exercise limitation, and quality of life. The session will focus on the symptom of dyspnea, one of the most important PCOs as it refers to many therapeutic approaches for respiratory illnesses.

Objectives:

  • Explain dyspnea and its pathophysiology, with particular attention to the clinical implications for the clinician.
  • Understand dyspnea in COPD)and how beneficial pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological strategies could be.
  • Understand the importance of drugs and especially how they could be effectively delivered to the patient.

Faculty:

  • Antonio Sacchetta, MD – From Bench to Bedside
  • Paolo Palange, MD – Dyspnea in COPD
  • Lorenzo Corbetta, MD – The Importance of the Device

Canadian Thoracic Society

Monday, October 30

11:00 am – 12:00 pm

The Canadian Thoracic Society's program includes an honorary lecture, a debate, and a series of lectures delivered by leading Canadian experts in respiratory medicine and research.

Objectives:

  • Apply updated evidence-based scientific information to improve lung health in patients with respiratory disease.
  • Collaborate with international partners on best practices for the prevention, management and treatment of respiratory disease.

Faculty:

  • Julie Morisset, MD – Advances in Pulmonary Rehabilitation for ILD
  • James Johnston, MD – The Relationship Between Tuberculosis and Diabetes
  • David Zienlinski, MD – New Challenges to Home-Based Noninvasive Ventilation

European Respiratory Society (ERS)

Lung Cancer Screening and Care

Tuesday, October 31

7:30 – 8:30 am

The European Respiratory Society’s program will describe the burden of lung cancer and the need for early diagnosis. It will focus on screening, as the only option for early diagnosis in the general population.

Objectives:

  • Understand why screening programs are necessary.
  • Explain the current status of screening in Europe and the US.
  • Summarize the problems that need to be solved in defining the at-risk populations.
  • Learn the imaging procedures and time intervals of testing.
  • Understand the use of biomarkers.
  • Understand the management of findings and the importance of smoking cessations programs.

Faculty:

  • Mina Gaga, MD, PhD – Lung Cancer Screening and Care:  The European Landscape
  • Anil Vachani, MD, FCCP – Lung Cancer Screening and Care: What Can We Learn From the Differences and Differences Between Europe and the US

The National Association for Medical Direction of Respiratory Care (NAMDRC)

The Respiratory Compromise Institute and Its Current and Future Research Endeavors

Tuesday, October 31

7:30 – 8:30 am

Respiratory compromise is now recognized as a significant and costly health issue. The Respiratory Compromise Institute is addressing this issue through extensive research and educational programs. The presentation will focus on a brief history of the Institute and then focus on research highlighting the frequency and cost of respiratory compromise, as well as future research endeavors. 

Objectives:

  • Define and identify clinical issues related to respiratory compromise.
  • Explain different perspectives of respiratory compromise from differing physician specialties.
  • Summarize current research focusing on respiratory compromise in the Medicare population.
  • Promote highest quality and standards for identification and treatment of respiratory compromise.

Faculty:

  • Gerry Criner, MD – Moderator and BRIEF Introduction
  • Phil Porte – History of RCI
  • James Lamberti, MD, FCCP, and Sidney Braman, MD, Master FCCP – Medicare Data Mining and Abstracts
  • Neil MacIntyre, MD, FCCP, and Jeff Vender, MD, FCCP – Future Research Considerations

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